Fluorescent Coral

Corals Light Up

Corals light up as fluoro symbiosis found, according to Nature News 5 July 2017, Nature Middle East 20 July 2017 and Proceedings of the royal Society B doi: 10.1098/rspb.2017.0320, published online 5 July 2017. Coral reefs have long been known as a classic example of symbiosis, consisting of a combination of coral polyps and algae. […]

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Super-Computer Tracks Protein Builders

Super-computer tracks protein builders, according to a report in ScienceNOW 27 October 2005. Proteins are made of small molecules called amino acids which need to be strung together in the correct order for the protein to function. The process of assembling proteins is carried out by a complex piece of cellular machinery called a ribosome. […]

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Super Molecular Blue

Super molecular blue found, as reported in Nature vol 436, p791, 11 August 2005. For many years scientists have known that the same pigment, anthocyanin is found in roses and also in cornflowers, but as the old saying (almost) goes, roses are red and cornflowers are blue. A group of Japanese scientists have worked out […]

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Sue Al Gore, says Weather Channel Founder

USA Weather Channel Founder says Al Gore should be sued, according to a report in Business and Media Institute, 5 March 2008. On March 3 2008 John Coleman told the 2008 International Conference on Climate Change in New York, he is highly critical of global warming alarmism, and that his recommended strategy for exposing “the […]

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Stress Protein Evolved Early

Stress protein evolved early according to a report in Science News 21 May 2005. The “fight or flight” response to stress in vertebrates (including humans) involves a hormone named corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) and a protein named CRH binding protein. Mark Huising of Wageningen University and Gert Flick of Radboud University in the Netherlands, have found […]

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Stone Age Pyrotechnology

Stone age pyrotechnology described in ScienceNOW 13 August 2009, and Science Daily and ABC News in Science, 14 August 2009. Archaeologists collecting stone tools at a site called Pinnacle Point in South Africa have long been puzzled by stone tools made of a fine grained rock named silcrete. The tools showed evidence of much working […]

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Spying with DNA

Spying with DNA is now possible. American scientists have recently developed a way to use, the genetic code (DNA) as a spy code to transfer information secretly. How does it work? Since there are only four chemical letters in the DNA code, A (adenine), T(Thymine), G (guanine) and C (cytosine), and 26 letters in English […]

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Something Magic About Three

Something “magic” about three, claims physicist, according to reports in Science Daily, and Nature, vol. 440, p289 and 315, 15 Mar 2006. A team of scientists led by Cheng Chin of University of Chicago have converted three ultra-cold caesium atoms into a new state of matter that was originally theorised to exist by a Russian […]

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Soil Superbugs

Soil superbugs found, according to a report in news@nature 19 January 2006 and Science, vol 311, p374, 20 January 2006. Bacteria resistant to many different antibiotics, often called “superbugs,” are becoming a serious problem in hospitals and other healthcare facilities. A team of researchers led by Gerard Wright of McMaster University, Ontario, Canada grew 480 […]

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Software for Stupid Atoms

Software for stupid atoms puzzles well known Australian physicist Paul Davies as he speculates in New Scientist 18 September 1999 about the origin of life. He admits life is not just chemistry. It is information carried on chemicals that makes living cells work. He asks “How did stupid atoms spontaneously write their own software and […]

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