Hydraulic Control for Tuna Fins

Hydraulic control for tuna fins found, according to Science (AAAS) News, ScienceDaily, and Stanford News Service 20 July 2017, and Science vol. 357, pp. 310-314 doi: 10.1126/science.aak9607, 21 July 2017. Bluefin tuna are large, fast and very agile fish. According to Stanford News, “Tuna have numerous morphological, physiological and behavioural adaptations to move rapidly through […]

Read More

Speech Evolved From Fish

Speech evolved from fish, according to reports in BBC News and ScienceNOW, 17 July 2008 and Science, vol. 321, p 417, 18 July 2008. A group of American researchers have been studying the brain activity of the fish that communicate with sound. The midshipman fish makes a nest hole under rocks and makes humming sounds […]

Read More

Sharks Have Nose for Heat and Cold

  Sharks have nose for heat and cold, according to a report in Nature Science Update, and ScienceNOW, 30 January 2003. Sharks are “the most temperature sensitive creatures we know,” says Brandon Brown, a physicist at University of San Francisco who studied electrical conductance of gel from pores in the sharks’ snouts called ampullae of […]

Read More

Shark Teeth Didn’t Evolve

Shark teeth didn’t evolve, according to a report in New Scientist 18 February 2006, p17. Chuck Ciampaglio of Wright State University, Ohio has studied the teeth of marine predators, including sharks, reptiles and mammals “from the past 100 million years”. After measuring overall size, cross section, serrations and number of cusps he classified them into […]

Read More

Seahorses and Salinity

Seahorses are normally found in marine environments but are they capable, or have they ever been capable of living in freshwater? A number of species are found in estuaries and can tolerate wide fluctuations in salinity, at least for short periods of time. In Tasmania, the Potbelly Seahorse inhabits the Tamar River estuary which, during […]

Read More

Seahorse Shape Explained

Seahorse shape explained, (theoretically, that is) claim scientists in Nature Communications DOI: doi:10.1038/ncomms1168 25 January 2011, and BBC Earth News 26 January 2011. Sam Van Wassenbergh from the University of Antwerp in Belgium and colleagues have used high speed photography and mathematical modelling to determine how far a seahorse can reach out to capture prey. […]

Read More

Scanned Fossils Confuse Water-Land Transition

Scanned fossils confuse water-land transition, according to reports from Duke University News 17 April 2009, ScienceDaily 19 April 2009 and Science vol. 324, p341 & p364, 17 April 2009. Researchers from Duke University found some fossils embedded in rocks from Greenland and rather than risk damaging them, they scanned them with a CT scanner and […]

Read More

Reverse Evolution in Fish

Reverse evolution in fish, claims an article in EurekAlert, 15 May 2008. Researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Centre, Seattle, have studied armour plating in stickleback fish in Lake Washington. Fifty years ago the lake was very murky, due to pollution, but following a massive clean-up the lake is now much clearer. The stickleback fish […]

Read More

Living Fossil Fish Story

Living fossil fish story reported in BBC News 1 August 2007. An Indonesian fisherman has caught a living Coelacanth fish off the coast of Sulawesi Island in Indonesia. The fish was 1.3 metres (4ft 4in) long and weighed 50kg (110lb) when caught, and has been frozen and sent for scientific tests. The Coelacanth was believed […]

Read More

How Flying Fish Fly

How flying fish fly, described in e! Science News 9 Sept 2010, and Journal of Experimental Biology (JEB) doi: 10.1242/jeb.050880 and ScienceShots, 10 Sept 2010. Flying fish have been observed to leap out of the water and glide for distances of up to 400m (1,300ft) at speeds of 70km/h. Haecheon Choi and Hyungmin Park, two […]

Read More