Fluorescent Coral

Corals Light Up

Corals light up as fluoro symbiosis found, according to Nature News 5 July 2017, Nature Middle East 20 July 2017 and Proceedings of the royal Society B doi: 10.1098/rspb.2017.0320, published online 5 July 2017. Coral reefs have long been known as a classic example of symbiosis, consisting of a combination of coral polyps and algae. […]

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Starfish Keep Their Cool

Starfish keep their cool according to an article in American Naturalist, vol. 174, pp. 890-897, 14 Oct 2009 and BBC News 28 Oct 2009. Starfish living in the intertidal zones can easily become overheated if they are left high and dry and exposed to the sun during a low tide because they cannot move until […]

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Spider Bubble Doubles Air Supply

Spider bubble doubles air supply, and more, according to articles in ABC News in Science and BBC Nature News 9 June 2011, and ScienceDaily 13 June 2011. The diving bell spider Argyroneta aquatic lives underwater in rivers and ponds, but breathes air. It lives, eats, mates and lays its eggs in a bubble of air […]

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Spider Ages by 80 Million Years

Spider ages by 80 million years, according to a report in Cretaceous Research, Volume 27, June 2006, Pages 442-446. David Penney and Paul Selden have found the first fossils of a spider that now lives in New Zealand. The fossils were found in Cretaceous ambers found in Manitoba and Alberta in Canada. The fossils are […]

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Size Matters for Geckos and Flies

Size matters for geckos’ and flies’ glue pads, as described in New Scientist, 6 September 2003, p22. Geckos, flies and some spiders are able to walk upside down by using tiny flat pads on their feet called spatulae. The spatulae form temporary atomic bonds with what ever surface they are walking on. Biologists were puzzled […]

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Silurian Sea Spider

Silurian sea spider preserved by volcanic eruption, according to a report in BBC News Online and ScienceNOW 21 October 2004. Sea spiders are delicate creatures with long thin legs that are rarely fossilised. Oxford University Palaeontologist Derek Siveter and colleagues have found the oldest most complete fossil sea spider preserved in volcanic rock in Hertfordshire, […]

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Shrimps’ Amazing Eyes

Shrimps’ amazing eyes revealed, as described in articles in EurekAlert, UQ News Online and ScienceNOW, 20 March 2008. A group of researchers led by Justin Marshall of the University of Queensland and the Queensland Brain Institute have been studying the eyes of mantis shrimps – large reef dwelling crustaceans, also known as stomatopods. They found […]

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Shrimp Eyes Make Better DVD Players

Shrimp eyes make better DVD players according to an article in ABC News in Science, 26 October 2009. Researchers studying the eyes of an Australian crustacean have found that its eyes process light in a more complex way than any man-made DVD or CD player. The shrimps’ eyes are able to convert linear polarised light […]

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Shedding Light on Super Reflective Proteins

Shedding light on super reflective proteins, described in an article in news@nature 8 December 2006. Scientists at the Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, Massachusetts, have found a group of proteins in octopus skin that reflect all wavelengths of light from any angle. The researchers found the proteins in cells called leucophores that form the bottom […]

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Sexy Daddy-Long-Legs

Sexy daddy-long-legs the same way for 400 million years, according a report in New Scientist, 20 September 2003, p19. A team of palaeontologists led by Jason Dunlop of Humboldt University found fossilised harvestmen (a type of spider commonly known as daddy-long-legs) in silica formations at Rhymie, near Aberdeen in Scotland that are believed to be […]

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