Single Origin for Rice

Single origin for rice, according to articles in ScienceDaily 2 May 2010 and BBC News 3 May 2010. Although there are thousands of varieties of the Asian rice plant Oryza sativa, they are grouped into two subspecies: indica and japonica. Scientists had believed these were domesticated separately from wild rice plants in India and China, […]

Read More

Short Dog Leg Gene

Short dog leg gene found, according to articles in National Institutes of Health News 16 July 2009 and ScienceDaily 17 July 2009 and Science, vol. 325, p995, 21 August 2009 (originally published in Science Express on 16 July 2009). An international team of scientists have found the gene that gives dog breeds such as dachshund, […]

Read More

Sharky Genes

Sharky genes reported in ABC News in Science 30 May 2007. Researchers at the Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, Singapore, have studied gene sequence sin the elephant sharks, bony fish, chickens, mice, dogs and humans. They found 154 genes in humans that could be matched to genes in sharks, mice and dogs. The researchers […]

Read More

Sea Urchin Surprise

Sea urchin surprise reported in news@nature, and Biology News Net 9 November 2006 and Science, vol. 314, p398, 10 Nov 2006. Scientists have decoded the genome of the California purple sea urchin and have identified 23,300 genes made from 814 million DNA code letters. The scientists were surprised to find 7,077 of the sea urchin […]

Read More

RNA Editing Makes Us Human

RNA editing makes us human, suggests a report in New Scientist, 29 January 2005, p13. RNA editing is a process that changes genetic information after it has been copied onto a molecule called messenger RNA, which carries the information to the protein making machinery in the cell. One editing process changes adenosine molecules to inosine. […]

Read More

Rice Gene Count

Rice gene count intrigues scientists who have sequenced the genome of the rice plant, according a report in Nature Science Update 5 April 2002. Rice seems to have somewhere between 40,000 and 50,000 genes. This may be more than humans, even though rice plants have one seventh as much DNA as humans. The reason for […]

Read More

Resistance Genes Pre-Date Antibiotics

Resistance genes pre-date antibiotics by “millions of years” according to a report in ScienceNOW 25 September 2002. One reason antibiotic resistance spreads so rapidly is that bacteria carry resistance genes on small loops of DNA called plasmids, which they can pass to other bacteria. Many evolutionists have claimed that resistance genes moved from the main […]

Read More

Re-designed DNA Doesn’t Fit

Re-designed DNA doesn’t fit, as noted in a brief item in Nature, vol. 440, p604, 10 August 2006. The “D” in DNA stands for deoxyribose, a sugar molecule made from a five sided ring of carbon atoms. Five sided sugars are called pentoses. Most other sugar molecules, such as glucose, are made from six sided […]

Read More

Rats and Jellyfish Join Bomb Squad

Rats and jellyfish combine to join bomb squad, as described in an article in New Scientist, 12 May 2007. Scientists at Temple University, Philadelphia are developing an explosive detector using smell receptor proteins found in rats. Smell receptor proteins work by sending electrical signals when certain chemicals attach to them. In animals the electrical signals […]

Read More

Quote: Reader’s Digest on Testosterone

“Without Testosterone, humans would essentially revert to the default, which is female. The Book of Genesis is therefore wrong. It isn’t women who are made out of men. Men are made out of women. Testosterone, to stretch the metaphor, is Eve’s rib.” Readers Digest September 2000, USA edition, p. 85 Editorial Comment: The reason the […]

Read More