Gravity Defying Spider Feet

Gravity defying spider feet inspire materials scientists, as reported in ScienceNOW 23 April 2004. Andrew Martin, a specialist in biomechanics, and colleagues at the Institute for Technical Zoology and Bionics, Bremen, Germany have studied spider feet to find out how spiders can walk upside down. As they suspected the spiders have tiny hairs on their […]

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Glass Engineering For Sponges

Glass engineering for sponges described in an article in Science, vol 309, p253, 8 July 2005. A team of scientists led by Joanna Aizenberg of Bell Laboratories/Lucent Technologies, Murray Hill, New Jersey has studied the skeleton of the glass sponge, Euplectella, to see how it constructs a strong stable structure from spicules of glass. Glass […]

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Giant Spider Story Shrinks

Giant spider story shrinks, as reported in BBC News, 15 Feb 2005. A fossil discovered in 1980 in Argentina was claimed to be “the most terrifying spider ever to roam the Earth” and was listed in the Guinness Book of Records as the world’s largest spider, has been rediscovered after it had been locked in […]

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Aussie Fossil Animals Are Plants

Aussie fossil animals are plants, claims University of Oregon scientist, according to articles in ScienceNOW 12 December 2012 and ABC News in Science 13 December 2012. The Ediacaran fossils are imprints of creatures found in the rocks in South Australia dated as 635 to 542 million years old, i.e. before the Cambrian explosion. They have […]

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Termite Mounds

Termites Got to Australia on Trees?

Termites got to Australia on trees?, according to articles in ScienceDaily 21 February 2017, University of Sydney News 22 February 2017 and Biology Letters, doi: 10.1098/rsbl.2016.0665, 22 February 2017. An international group of scientists led by Nathan Lo of University of Sydney have carried out a study of the genomes of the termite subfamily Nasutitermitinae, […]

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Crabs and Athletic Shoes

“When is a crab like a high-performance athletic shoe?” asks ScienceSHOTS, 20 April 2006. The whole item states: “Pump it up. A crab relies on its rigid shell for protection and support, so it must quickly compensate when it moults. Marine crabs create a temporary exoskeleton by pumping their outer layers full of seawater. But […]

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Fossil Plants in Limestone

Identified: Plants in St Louis limestone. Another first for Creation Researchers as more Giant Tassel Ferns (Lepidodendron) are excavated, mapped and identified alongside marine brachiopods in the oil bearing, Lower Mississippian, St Louis limestone of Middle Tennessee. There is no doubt that this is a flood deposit (mixed land and sea creatures) and preliminary indications […]

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Become Immortal

“Become immortal” proclaims an advertisement from the Australian Museum included with the Autumn 2000 edition of their magazine Nature Australia. For $5000 the museum will name a newly discovered invertebrate animal after you. Editorial Comment: Obviously, the museum does not expect the bug to evolve or they could be sued for false advertising. Were you […]

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Amazingly Intact Ancient Arthropod

Amazingly intact ancient arthropod found according to reports in ScienceDaily 7 & 9 February 2011 and Geology, 2011; DOI: 10.1130/G31648.1. The exoskeletons or hard cuticles of arthropods are formed from chitin fibres embedded in structural proteins. Chitin is a modified carbohydrate made from long chains of a glucose derivative named N-acetylglucosamine. Proteins and carbohydrates are […]

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Hundred Million Years of Fossil Sex

A hundred million years of fossil sex revealed, according to BBC News 18 June 2009. A new technique for examining the internal structure of fossils has enabled scientists to examine the reproductive organs of ostracods (tiny shellfish) fossils from the Santana Formation in Brazil. The fossils were embedded in rocks that also contained well preserved […]

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