Woodworking

Neanderthal Woodworking

Archaeologists have studied a large number of pieces of wood found at a site named Schöningen13 in Germany.  Many of the wooden objects show signs of being deliberately split and shaped into wooden tools. There were no human bones at the site, but as the site is dated at 300,000 years it is claimed the […]

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Middle East & South Asia

Real Indian Genome Study Reveals Origins

India has a large and diverse population with many language and tribal groups, but little is known about where they originally came from.  An international group of scientists from USA, India and Finland have carried out an extensive study of genomes of over 2,700 people from every geographic region, speakers of every major language group, […]

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Young People & Brain

Academic Freedom Enables Puberty Blocker Win

In 2011 Michael Biggs, an associate professor of sociology at the University of Oxford was concerned when Tavistock and Portman NHS Trust’s Gender Identity Development Service (GIDS) started an experiment giving puberty blockers to adolescents as young as 12.  In 2018 he sought out results of this experimental treatment but could not find anything until […]

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Humans Versus Snails in Value

Humans versus snails in value.  The Research Institute for the Environment and Livelihoods at Charles Darwin University, Australia conducted an online survey of 2,139 Australians about what they would give priority to saving from destruction in a bushfire (wildfire).  Participants were asked to choose from a list of 11 options, including people, animals, plants and […]

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Descendants of Abraham, Adam and Noah

Did you know that the bombs and bullets that plague the middle east at present neither started with Jews nor Arabs? It started when one man Abraham listened to his wife instead of God (Genesis 16:2-3).  There were no “Jews” until after the ancient kingdom of Israel was divided (1 Kings 12) and Judah was […]

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Tar on Rock

Palaeolithic Pitch

A group of scientists in Germany have studied a type of black pitch named birch tar (sometimes called birch bark pitch), claimed to be the “oldest synthetic substance made by early humans”.  This substance has been found in Neanderthal sites and was used as an adhesive in tools and artefacts. It also has waterproofing and […]

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Buried Bones

Neolithic Violence from Changing Economics

An international team of scientists have compiled data from studies of human remains in 180 archaeological sites in Denmark, France, Germany, Great Britain, Spain, and Sweden, dated between around 8000 – 4000 years ago – believed to be the time when farming replaced hunter-gathering in Europe.  They found evidence of many head injuries from blunt […]

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Rainbow Landscape

More Rainbows Coming with Climate Change

A group of researchers from various USA universities has used crowd sourced photos and computer models to predict the effects of climate change on the frequency of rainbows up to the year 2100. The researchers gathered thousands of photos of rainbows from publicly available photo sharing sites and matched the photos to rainfall, cloud cover […]

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Buried Bones

Gender Fluid Archaeology

When archaeologists find buried human skeletons in an excavation they are usually able to identify them as male or female according to their bone structure and DNA.  The Black Trowel Collective of American, a group identifying themselves as “anarchist archaeologists,” are now claiming that “archaeologists must centre the fluidity of gender in their archaeological practice”.  […]

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Smelling Roses

Pleasant Smells are Multi Cultural

An international team of scientists asked people from 10 widely different cultures to rate how pleasant they found 10 distinctive scents.  The research was carried out in diverse communities across the world, including hunter-gatherer societies, agricultural societies and urban societies. The scents were presented in the form of identical odour dispensers shaped like pens, so […]

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